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The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, opening in Montgomery, Ala., on Thursday, is dedicated to victims of lynching. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

New Lynching Memorial Is A Space 'To Talk About All Of That Anguish'

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice opens Thursday in Montgomery, Ala., and includes monuments for victims of lynchings. Organizers say it's time "to confront the brutality."

New Lynching Memorial Is A Space 'To Talk About All Of That Anguish'

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Mel Brooks' office is lined with awards — he's in the elite EGOT club — having won Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony awards. Danny Hajek/NPR hide caption

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Danny Hajek/NPR

Mel Brooks Says It's His Job 'To Make Terrible Things Entertaining'

Brooks, 91, has made a career of poking fun at topics that normally wouldn't make you laugh. "The comedy writer is like the conscience of the king," Brooks says. "He's got to tell him the truth."

Mel Brooks Says It's His Job 'To Make Terrible Things Entertaining'

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Yawkey Way, outside Fenway Park, was named for the late, former Boston Red Sox owner, Tom Yawkey, who was known for his philanthropy, but also for what was a racist ball club. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Boston Red Sox Want To Strike Former Owner's Name Off Street Sign

The team's owners want to rename Yawkey Way, outside Fenway Park, to distance themselves from former owner Tom Yawkey's era of racial discrimination. Others argue that he redeemed himself.

Boston Red Sox Want To Strike Former Owner's Name Off Street Sign

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Joseph James DeAngelo, a suspect in a series of killings in California, was arrested Tuesday. Sacramento County, Calif., Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Sacramento County, Calif., Sheriff's Office via AP

'Golden State Killer,' Suspected Of Terrorizing California For Years, Arrested

Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, was taken into custody at his home outside Sacramento, not far from where officials say a decade-long crime spree of dozens of rapes and murders began in the 1970s.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of Marvel Studios. Here, Marvel Studios President Kevin Feige presents at the 2015 D23 Expo in California. Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Disney hide caption

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Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Disney

Marvel Studios' Kevin Feige On The Future Of Marvel Movies

The studio president tells NPR, "Black Panther will not be a one-off for us. ... Movies should represent the world in which they are made." Marvel's latest, Avengers: Infinity War, is out this week.

A U.S. Army team transfers the remains of Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga., at Dover Air Force Base, Del., on Oct. 5, 2017. Wright was one of four U.S. troops killed in an ambush in Niger. Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

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Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP

Pentagon Cites Multiple Missteps That Led To Ambush Of U.S. Troops In Niger

The report says U.S. troops wound up on a more dangerous mission than planned and were exposed and vulnerable when attacked by Islamist extremists in a remote corner of the African nation.

Mick Mulvaney, acting director of the CFPB, testifies at a House hearing. Mulvaney says he doesn't need to run "a Yelp for financial services sponsored by the federal government." Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The Consumer Complaints Database That Could Disappear From View

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau chief Mick Mulvaney says he may shut down public access to more than a million complaints Americans have made about financial institutions.

The Consumer Complaints Database That Could Disappear From View

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Port Authority Ethics Committee Chairwoman Caren Turner flashed her credentials before berating an officer after a traffic stop involving her daughter. She resigned after video of the incident surfaced. Tenafly Police Department hide caption

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Tenafly Police Department

VIDEO: New Jersey Ethics Official Resigns Over Ethics Violations, Berating Officer

A state official flashed her credentials and powerful connections after a traffic stop involving her daughter. She profanely told a policeman to shut up. She no longer holds the post.

An illustration from the Maciejowski Bible (also called the Morgan or Crusader Bible) circa 1250, called "David Spares Saul In the Cave." The Pierpont Morgan Library hide caption

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The Pierpont Morgan Library

DNA Analysis Of Ancient Excrement Reveals The Diets Of Centuries Past

Researchers are exhuming ancient dung from toilets of yore to reconstruct snapshots of food and lifestyle in bygone centuries. The parasites that show up in privies reveal a lot about what people ate.

By some estimates, nearly half of the people confined in U.S. jails and prisons have a mental illness, notes Alisa Roth, author of Insane: America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness. Darrin Klimek/Getty Images hide caption

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Darrin Klimek/Getty Images

'Insane': America's 3 Largest Psychiatric Facilities Are Jails

Alisa Roth's new book suggests U.S. jails and prisons have become warehouses for the mentally ill. They often get sicker in these facilities, Roth says, because they don't get appropriate treatment.

'Insane': America's 3 Largest Psychiatric Facilities Are Jails

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